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Very new here - still unsure

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  1. mags64
    mags64 avatar
    3 posts
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    08 Mar 2019
    08 Mar
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    Hello all!  So, I will be turning 55 in 4 weeks, and I have never tried to quit smoking.  Smoking has been a part of my life, my ENTIRE life - literally.  My mother smoked while pregnant with me.  I grew up in a smoking household.  And by 15, I was hooked.  I have noticed coughing more in the last few months, but still can't imagine my life without cigarettes.  I still smoke at home, and am sick of all the cleaning I have to do to keep up with it.  Smoking has been like a friend to me - I know that may sound crazy, but it has been here for me during very difficult times.  I could use words of wisdom, support and encouragement.  As I sit here, I just put on a patch, have some nicotine gum in my mouth, and thought I would sign up for this forum.  With my extreme thanks!
  2. brieffree
    brieffree avatar
    1230 posts
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    08 Mar
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    Hello mags64

    Welcome to helpline, No dub you come to the right place, Please feel free to post how you do!
    Do  not be afraid, Quit is the best decision ever!

    You did the first step, enjoy to brief pure Air!

    You can do it!
  3. atp
    atp avatar
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    08 Mar in reply to mags64
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    Hey mags,

    Join the club of all us former non-smokers trying to keep our quits. 

    I can totally relate, i just recently quit after smoking over 32 years and I felt the same way before I quit. Smokes were a part of my life. I didn't know how to do anything without having a smoke associated with it.  Even the first few days of my quit i sat there wondering how non-smokers get by without smoking. But then I started to see my smokers cough go away, and I could breath a bit better and I changed my attitude to look at the benefits of not smoking. Then there was the day, maybe around the 6th or 7th day where I stepped outside and took a deep breath of fresh air and wow did it feel good. Then you start to notice how awful stale smoke smells. 

    Around day 3 or 4 I went on a total cleaning spree. Got rid of all my smoking related stuff (all butt cans, ashtrays, lighters, matches, and the pack of smokes), sprayed lysol all over everything and washed and cleaned all my jackets. Just need to cleanse all the bad smoking reminders and start clean and fresh. 

    Quitting is hard work.. It requires determination and willpower. Brieffree who replied above quit 3 years ago and was a 3 pack a day smoker - there is no better inspiration. 

    Spend some time reading through the posts on this site - there is an awful lot of good, helpful,  stuff to be had. 
     
    Last modified on 08 Mar 2019 08:06 by atp
  4. efreeman75
    efreeman75 avatar
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    08 Mar
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    Hi mags and welcome.

    It's great that you're reaching out for help.  Many of us too have smoked for decades and found it difficult to imagine life without cigarettes.

    The patch and the gum can help lessen the physical dependence, but do you really want to quit?  Do you REALLY want to quit?  Smoking is not your friend.  Unless you consider a friend as someone who steals your money and slowly chokes you to death.  A deceitful, lying, thief!  Yes, smoking was always with us, but it did not actually help us get through anything.  That was our junkie minds convincing us that we needed cigarettes to handle life.

    You've already taken the first step to quitting - you're thinking about it.  That's how a plan begins.  I encourage you to complete the exercises on this site and read through the forums for additional advice.  There is a wealth of knowledge here to draw upon.  And we're all here with you through the ups and downs.

    Sorry if I sound harsh above, but I'm trying to be a true friend.  One whom helps and supports.

    My quit coincided very closely with my wife's birthday.  She thinks it's the best birthday gift ever.  I couldn't agree with her more, although she still expected to unwrap something.

    Mags, again, welcome to the forum.  I hope you like it here.

    E
  5. mags64
    mags64 avatar
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    08 Mar 2019
    08 Mar
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    Thank you, thank you ALL!  efreeman75 asked "do you REALLY want to quit", and my answer would have to be no.  But I DO get it - I know smoking is NOT my friend, it just FEELS that way sometimes. 

    So, I tried sleeping with the patch, and couldn't, and read that it may cause sleep disturbances, so I removed it. Am looking into a stop smoking program in my city and I already have a bunch of gum and a few patches.

    A few more questions though, if I may:

    1.  What was your quit method of choice, if any?
    2.  Did anyone also find it hard to sleep with the patch?
    3.  How many times did you try and quit before you succeeded?  I hear many people say they tried many times before it took hold.

    Thank you again so much - glad I found you!
  6. sarah, quit coach
    sarah, quit coach avatar
    127 posts
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    28 Nov 2017
    08 Mar
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    Welcome mags64 - so glad you're here! You've made big change already, and for that, be proud.
    Some of our wonderful community members have come forward to welcome you too, and if you're looking for support, information and shared experiences - this is the place!

    If i may share a few points: yes, the patch - and making any kind of change to your smoking - can disrupt your sleep. Its a side effect of the patch, and its also a withdrawal symptom. it is not always comfortable, but it is your body working hard to get well.

    And if you would like to know if there are any programs in your town/city, you can search the 'find local support' at the top of the webpage, or you can call a Quit Coach at 1-877-513-5333 who would be happy to conduct a search for you.

    We thank you for your honesty & wisdom you've brought here today.
    Take care
    Sarah

  7. atp
    atp avatar
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    08 Mar in reply to mags64
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    Mags,

    I hear a lot of people complain about vivid dreams and the like when on the patch, and most take it off at night. I myself went cold turkey and just fought through the nicotine withdrawal. Been smoke free now 68 days. 

    It isn't a matter of needing to try quitting a bunch of times, it is about being ready and wanting to quit. The physical withdrawal is only a few days to a week before it peaks and starts to subside. It is the metal side of quitting that is the hard part. You have to not want to smoke in spite of everything that the addict in your head will being telling you otherwise.

    It sounds like you are working yourself up to quitting. That is great, now educate yourself. Read as much as you can about quitting, read the posts on this site, talk to your doctor or join a quit group. Go through the Quit Plan on this site. 

    I've never met a former smoker who regretted quitting.

  8. wandam
    wandam avatar
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    08 Mar
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    Welcome mags64,

    I can relate to a lot of what you are saying! I too started smoking in my early teens & continued to smoke until age 49, quit for 9 months, relapsed, now quit again since Dec 3/18. I never thought I would ever quit to be honest. I used Champix & amazingly it helped me quit. I also utilize my supports, remind myself of all the benefits of being smoke free & remember all the negativity that came with smoking.
    Last modified on 08 Mar 2019 16:10 by wandam
  9. mags64
    mags64 avatar
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    08 Mar
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    Wow - I have to say, I so appreciate all the kindness, encouragement and support!  Thank you all!
  10. butterflyna
    butterflyna avatar
    125 posts
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    15 Feb 2018
    09 Mar
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    Hi mags64,

    Welcome to the bestest place to get support if you want to quit smoking (sorry, I am biased but I have such great reason to be lol) I am also on the patch. Have been for hmmmm, let's see ... I check my smoke date calculator lol ...8 days and 18 hours and I have never felt better in my life!!! I had gotten to the point where my coughing got so bad that I woke up one morning and couldn't breath at all. I almost died alone in my apt.  That was it for me. It actually took that for me to even think about a quit. Prior to that I would wake up hacking and have to rush to get 3 different puffers into me BEFORE I could go out and have a cigarette! Is that insane or what!! It never gets better, it will only get worse the more we continue to smoke.
    Anyhow, I did see you questions posted re: The patch and I will answer as to what has been my experience has been ...
    1.  What was your quit method of choice, if any?
    2.  Did anyone also find it hard to sleep with the patch?
    3.  How many times did you try and quit before you succeeded?  I hear many people say they tried many times before it took hold.


    1. My quit method of choice has been the patch. I bought the Mist Spray in my last attempt to quit (Feb 1st) and I lasted barely 3 days. It wasn't enough for me. The patch, for me takes away the nicotine addiction so I can focus on my other main addiction ... The habit aspect, which is very difficult to break. So far it has worked wonders for me in this attempt to quit.
    2. Sleeping and the patch; Yes, I did have a difficult time for the first 2 days. Very bad dreams/nightmares. They have since subsided and I am sleeping better. My quit counsellor did say if I wanted to take them off at night I could. However, for me, waking up in the morning which is my worse time to be triggered, WITHOUT A PATCH, was too big of a risk for me to take. Now that is just me. You would have to decide this for yourself.
    3. This particular time I tried once before and like I said only lasted barely 3 days. I was so disappointed in myself. Straight after that I set another quit date for that night but never stuck to it. Really didn't want to quit at that point. I waited until the next month and really got to work on setting myself and my supports up. I was weaned down to 10 cig a day and smoked all through Feb. My quit date was March 1st. It has been since then I have not smoked, by the grace of God.  One day at a time (ODAAT) and NOPE (Not One Puff Ever). You may see these a fair bit around the forums ;)

    So glad you found this site. atp, efreeman, brieffree, etc. They have helped me soooo much. And the quit coaches as well, they are awesome! They all help so much and give you honest advice and suggestions. They basically share there own story and that is what has helped me immensely. Hope to see around. KEEP COMING BACK! We all need each other <3

    butterflyna

  11. efram, quit coach
    efram, quit coach avatar
    116 posts
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    29 Nov 2017
    10 Mar in reply to butterflyna
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    Hi All,

    Just wanted to add a quick point about sleeping with the patch: it's works best if the patch is put on first thing in the morning, rather than before bed. The patch is designed to give more nicotine during the day and less at night; if it's put on before bed, you get more nicotine when you're sleeping (when your body isn't used to much nicotine) and less while you're awake, resulting in trouble sleeping and more daytime cravings.  

    Hope this helps!

    -Efram
    Last modified on 10 Mar 2019 11:55 by efram, quit coach
  12. efreeman75
    efreeman75 avatar
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    02 Apr 2018
    13 Mar
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    Hi mags,

    I hope you're still with us.

    In answer to your questions:

    1.  My quit method of choice was cold turkey.  Many of us here with long-term quits did it cold turkey.  I think of nicotine as a drug addiction, and the most effective and efficient method to get 'clean' was cold turkey.

    2.  Didn't use the patch.  But quitting smoking causes disrupted sleep/insomnia for many.  I think many get so tired, they weaken and relapse.  Get sleep whenever you can.

    3.  This is my first quit.  Like many here, I smoked for many years.  I decided to quit without any forethought, and committed to it.  It was my time.

    This is my personal experience, but we are all here collectively to support and encourage each other.  I hope you give quitting a shot - you won't regret it!
  13. brieffree
    brieffree avatar
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    13 Mar
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    Hi All

    Interesting Point

    My quit method was cold Turkey, stop or stop! No Matter what!

    Then, the problem begins, I sleep and relapse many times, until  I decided to use the Mist when I need it and it works for me! I used to smoke 3 pks a day. Due to I am so addictive to Nicotine.

    This is my first try to quit because of my health or else! I can denied that I was tiered to smoke! I JUST NEEDED HELP!
    Then I change complete my routine, way to eat! to exercise and all the rest.

    The Most important part of my quit was to find this Website, who support me every step of the way and those Fabulous Members and Couches!

    Yes, this is a personal Matter, I was Smoker for many years. No More! Thank to My Full time Quitting Job !  
    Last modified on 13 Mar 2019 20:01 by brieffree
  14. treepeo
    treepeo avatar
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    13 Mar
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    Hi mags64,

    You mentioned your cough and I winced.  I had such a bad smoker's cough that people would stare at me wherever I went.  I was so embarrassed.  I quit over two years ago and now I just cough normally.  What a relief.

    It is up to you whether you want to use NRTs or to quit cold turkey.  It doesn't matter either way.  The most important thing is to stop smoking.  Honestly, it is a really hard addiction to beat, but you will be so glad you did.  You will feel better, smell better, and have a lot more time on your hands.  Because you waste a lot of time when you smoke.

    Do read through the material on this site because it may help to motivate you.  Make a list of all of the reasons why you want to quit.  And give it a shot.  Trust me when I say that life is so much better as a non-smoker.

    You can quit, mags64.  Believe in yourself.
  15. clayzeegirl
    clayzeegirl avatar
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    14 Mar
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    Good day everyone.  I am new here. I have been smoking since I was 12 years old. Yup.   Long time.  I managed to quit for nine months 10 years ago.  I used the patch then as well.  I am 69 now.  YIKES.  I started the patch a week ago.  I don't have cravings for a smoke, I just want one. Does that make sense?  I do want to eat more. Not a good thing for me.  Always battling that part of life as well.
    I find that I can't sleep with the patch on.I  do take it off before bed.
    I hope that coming here and reading the posts I will get more incentive to keep going. 
  16. efreeman75
    efreeman75 avatar
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    14 Mar
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    Hi Clayzee and welcome.  Totally get what you mean about not craving a smoke, just wanting one - that's the mental part of the quit.  You're getting the physical part sedated from the patch.  Make quitting smoking your priority and the weight gain can be dealt with after.  I actually lost weight when I quit as I became obsessed with living healthier.

    Reach out any time you need to.  I always have an opinion!!!
  17. clayzeegirl
    clayzeegirl avatar
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    14 Mar in reply to efreeman75
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    Thank you for responding. I will get out more now that the weather is better.  That will keep me moving. 
  18. wandam
    wandam avatar
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    14 Mar
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    Hi & Welcome clayzeegirl,

    Glad you joined our site & congratulations on making the decision to be smoke free again! I too quit for the first time in 2016 for 9 months & relapsed, now quit again. I used Champix both times without any NRT. Definitely found the first 3 days were the hardest on each quit & as the days passed it slowly got easier.

    So hang in there, you quit for 9 months once before, you can do this one day at time, little baby steps.
  19. clayzeegirl
    clayzeegirl avatar
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    14 Mar in reply to wandam
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    Thank you for the welcome. and support.  One day at a time.
  20. treepeo
    treepeo avatar
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    14 Mar in reply to clayzeegirl
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    Hi clayzeegirl,

    It's so wonderful that you are quitting again.  Good for you!  You will get "wants", meaning it crosses your mind that you want a smoke.  That is because we smoked for pretty much any reason at all, so we have to work to break that mental pattern.  When that happens, try to do something to distract yourself.  I know it's hard at first, but it will get easier over time.

    By the way, I started smoking at around 12 too, although not regularly.  I used to pinch my mother's tobacco.  Although I am younger than you, I guess it's a generational thing.  That seems to be what we did back then.  So glad that things are changing . . .
  21. butterflyna
    butterflyna avatar
    125 posts
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    26 Mar
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    Hi clayzeegirl!!

    Welcome!!! I hope you are still with us!? So great the posts that were left in response to yours. All the people here, the quit coaches too, are fabulous. Any questions or concerns, trust me, we have all been through it and only want to help others become smoke free too. Yes, like efreeman, wandam and treepeo have said above, the "wants" are normal. I am on the patch as well and find it takes away the physical addiction to nicotine, but not the mental addiction. That can be difficult but way easier than dealing with both at the same time. I can't believe some of the people on here quit cold turkey! Power to them!!! It's just not me. I tried that way. It was too difficult for me. I had really weird dreams in the beginning of wearing the patch but find it leaves, also I read the post from a quit coach saying to put the patch on in the morning so as by that night it won't be too strong. I do that. Anyway ... So great that you are here and we can face the journey together. Wherever you are, just let us know. I have been trying since last year and today only am on my 2nd day again, thank God! Just trust the journey. I do. One day at a time. <3


    butterflyna
    xo
  22. jenna c, quit coach
    jenna c, quit coach avatar
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    26 Mar
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    Hi everyone!

    Thanks for the nice words butterflyna and I am glad to hear you are still plugging away at this, DAY 2 ODAAT.  Yes, you are right the patches along with any nicotine replacement therapy (lozenge, gum, spray, inhaler) will help with the cravings but it's still the routine and behaviour you are trying to change. The triggers may be there for some time too.

    As a smoker you may sometimes confuse other uncomfortable feelings with an urge to smoke. If so, you could benefit by practicing other ways of coping with those feelings.

    Try the 4d's:
    Most people can handle urges to smoke using one of the 4 D's:
    1. Delay.
    Most urges will go away in a few minutes.
    2. Distract.
    Take your mind off smoking.
    Think of something else to do.
    Any shift in attention will take away most or all of most people's urges. (e.g. by taking a walk, listening to some music, getting up and doing something else).
    3. Deep Breathing:
    Take two deep breaths. Breathe in slowly & deeply. Then breathe out. Many smokers only breathe deeply when they are smoking. Do you?
    4. Drink water.
    Drink it slowly and keep it in your mouth awhile.

    Clayzeegirl, it is ok to take the patch off before sleeping as long as you have a plan in the morning to deal with the cravings. Such as using the gum, lozenge, spray or inhaler. May also try using the 4d's. Good luck!

    Hope this helps.
    jenna c, quit coach
  23. butterflyna
    butterflyna avatar
    125 posts
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    27 Mar in reply to jenna c, quit coach
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    Hi Jenna,

    Thank you! You are so right in your post. Thanks for adding <3
  24. patti lmd
    patti lmd avatar
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    27 Mar
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    Trust me I can relate to how you are feeling. I started the Champix on March 18 the day my father started his radiation therapy. Like you smoking has been apart of my entire life as well, and the thought of how to go through my day without it scared the crap out of me, Anxiety was through the roof. Guess what I am on day 3 of not smoking and I never felt so proud of myself and so relieved.  You have great support here, you can do this. Find the best method that will help stick with this support forum too, we all can relate to you..
  25. cleanslate
    cleanslate avatar
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    26 Mar 2019
    27 Mar
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    I am preparing myself for becoming a non-smoker. I feel the negative affects of smoking on my body and need to change. I am trying to gather supplies to put into my non-smoking tool bag that will encourage, challenge and support me. My hope is that this community will be the source of these and  a crucial item in my tool bag. I am learning the nature of my habit, I have found that in evening holding off on my next cigarette that my mind easily convinces me to light up, and I do. My quit date is April 15. I know you are saying why not today.  Well one dies not play hockey without the gear. So my question is, how have you eased the naming and nagging of the mind in its struggle to avoid lighting up?
  26. efreeman75
    efreeman75 avatar
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    27 Mar
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    Hi cleanslate.  It sounds like you're preparing an arsenal for success!!!  A lot of my success was that I turned to exercise.  You can't really put it in a toolbox, but it is nevertheless a technique.  Exercising got rid of some extra energy and anxiety.  And smoking on a treadmill is so counter-productive that the thought never really entered my mind.  Even just getting up and going for a 2 minute walk around the office or yard was enough to distract myself from a craving.  Soon, the combination of not smoking and increased exercise became quite noticeable in my health that I can't imagine ever having a cigarette again.  Life is good. 

    Preparation is key to success for many people.  Keep building up that quit kit.
  27. cleanslate
    cleanslate avatar
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    28 Mar in reply to efreeman75
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    Thank you for your acknowledgement and advice. Nothing in life is easy. I have started daily walks. I will sit down today, make a list of things to do to avert a craving. For example 10 push ups, or jumping until it makes me laugh! Maybe a gym is in my future, for now I need the instant distraction  and exercise is accessible immediately and a will fit in my tool bag! Thank you!
  28. clayzeegirl
    clayzeegirl avatar
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    11 Mar 2019
    28 Mar
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    Good day, everyone
    I have been smoke free for almost a month now.  I am so wanting to smoke again!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!.   sigh.    I am walking a lot again. Drinking water, doing all the suggestions. Have been going to my water fit twice weekly. Volunteer twice weekly. My biggest problem now is the weight. I have gained 5 pounds.   I weigh in only to find I have gained(WW).At only 5 feet tall every ounce I gain I feel it. Oh, the frustration.
    Thanks for listening.
  29. treepeo
    treepeo avatar
    749 posts
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    28 Mar in reply to clayzeegirl
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    Hi clayzeegirl,

    You have now been smoke free for almost a month - YIPPEE!!! You should be really proud of yourself, because that is A BIG DEAL!!!

    I know that you get those thoughts where you miss smoking.  That's a normal part of the quitting process.  But think about how hard you worked to get to this point.  Do you really want to go back to where you started from?  There must have been lots of reasons why you decided to quit.  You are well on your way, so keep it going.  You won't regret it.

    I am really happy to hear that you have come this far, clayzeegirl.  You should do something nice for yourself to celebrate this wonderful achievement!
  30. clayzeegirl
    clayzeegirl avatar
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    28 Mar in reply to treepeo
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    Thank you treepeo.  I appreciate your encouragement.
30 posts, 0 answered