Forums / Welcome / New journey looking for tips

New journey looking for tips

8 posts, 0 answered
  1. hilz
    hilz  avatar
    4 posts
    Registered:
    11 Feb 2019
    30 Mar
    Link to this post
    hi folks! I tried really hard today to get back on the horse. I was down to a max of 5-7 cigs a day up until a setback a few weeks ago. I made my way back up closer to the 15 per day area and was feeling awful about it. Well today with only one nicorette and a priceless call to smokers helpline I made it through the day with only 4 cigarettes smoked. This isn’t a quit, but it’s the best I’ve done in months. It’s an attempt. I’ve started making myself smoke outside now to see if it would help and it did, if anyone else needs a helpful tip... I’m looking for any and all tips on all topics. I’m particularly curious about setting a quit date and how to handle setbacks after the quit date. Do I have to start over? Why do we pick one? Does cutting back really help get us to an actual quit free time? Has anyone found hiding the cigarettes in the freezer helpful after quitting completely instead of breaking them or throwing them out? I can’t see myself doing that. It doesn’t make sense that I’ll burn that money up in smoke, I know, but won’t throw it in the trash. Feeling lost on the path of the long run more than anything. All thoughts are welcomed :-)
  2. atp
    atp avatar
    293 posts
    Registered:
    31 Dec 2018
    30 Mar in reply to hilz
    Link to this post
    Hilz,

    There are so many different quit methods, the only one that matters is the one that gets you to keep your quit. Mostly though it boils down to the willpower to want to quit and to stay quit - it is hard work and it takes effort. It took me more than 30 years to figure that out and realize Not One Puff Ever. I quit having smoked pack a day. Tried the cut down method and  only left myself more agitated each day as my body wanted more nicotine. Cold Turkey is what did it for me. Others use NRT's or Champix. Those are tools to help smooth out the nicotine withdrawal. The hard part of quitting is the mental side - dealing with the addict in your head, breaking routines we are so used to (coffee/smoke, get in car/smoke, done eating/smoke, etc). 
    Best you can do is learn all you can about quitting smoking. Lots of good stuff on this site and elsewhere. Put a quit plan together. Pick a date or just go for it. 
    Seeing as you are trying to work on weaning the best I can suggest is break the routine. Don't have a smoke when you normally would. But you know, if you can get down to 5 a day, just finish the next pack and see how long you can go without having a smoke. A day, maybe two, more? 
    Oh Yeah - I did the old keep a pack of smokes to show them who's boss when I quit thing - the smokes won every time. This time I tossed everything, including all butt cans and lighters.
  3. hilz
    hilz  avatar
    4 posts
    Registered:
    11 Feb 2019
    30 Mar in reply to atp
    Link to this post
    Thank you atp. You’ve answered some questions for me and provided some really good tips. Appreciated so much! 
  4. treepeo
    treepeo avatar
    753 posts
    Registered:
    29 Nov 2017
    30 Mar
    Link to this post
    Hi hilz,

    I was unable to cut down.  I ended up smoking more because I was stressed out about trying to cut down!

    I didn't set an actual quit date but rather, a quit time.  That is, I was taking two weeks off at Christmas, and I vowed that I would go back to work as a non-smoker.  The value of a quit date is that it gives you a time frame to work towards, and a goal to reach.  Now, the first day I tried to quit (and I quit cold turkey), I only made it to 7:00 p.m. and then I lit up.  But then I knew what I was up against.  And two days later I tried again and stuck with it.  I have now been a non-smoker for over two years.

    It would have been easier for me to give in if I hadn't set a quit time.  But because I had made that vow to myself, I would not let myself give in no matter how hard it got.

    You will experience physical cravings and mental wants.  It is really helpful to try to change your routines, to distract yourself, and to drink lots of water.  Make a list of reasons why you want to quit and keep it handy.  And read about the benefits of quitting smoking.  Do whatever it takes to keep yourself motivated.  And live by NOPE - Not One Puff Ever.

    Non-smokers are now in the majority. Come join us. It is way better on this side!
  5. brieffree
    brieffree avatar
    1230 posts
    Registered:
    28 Nov 2017
    30 Mar
    Link to this post
    Hits

    If you are reducing slow congrats!
    Do not be afraid to get rid off all, nothing bad happened if you do not smoke! Just Pure Air!

    I know is hard, but you can do it!
  6. sarah, quit coach
    sarah, quit coach avatar
    127 posts
    Registered:
    28 Nov 2017
    30 Mar
    Link to this post
    A person's quit method is so unique, and often does involve some amount of trial & error - past experiences that shape one way of doing something over the other.
    Congratulations, hilz, on making changes with your smoking & your openness to trying new things. Were there one or two strategies where you found successes? And while the successes may seems minor... remember, they all add up! 
    And choosing a quit date is just that: a success! Why? Because its the day you have decided to prepare and plan and set up strategies & goals, all give quitting smoking a GO!
    Often times people who are quitting smoking will choose a date they deem feasible and can be confident about, taking the time to have things in place they need most. Sometimes people also choose a date of significance (a birthday, anniversary, etc) so they can add another memorable milestone to the already special day. 
    Whatever you decide, hilz, we are behind you & support you. Congrats on all the change so far...
    Best regards,
    Sarah
  7. hilz
    hilz  avatar
    4 posts
    Registered:
    11 Feb 2019
    31 Mar
    Link to this post
    Thank you treepeo, brieffree, and Sarah. I am doing the best I’ve ever done on purpose by not smoking since waking up. So far it’s been just over 4 hours. It’s unheard of for me. I haven’t had a nicorette yet either. I’m hoping I can last at least without a smoke. I got some helpful tips upon calling smokers helpline again. I highly recommend it to anyone who needs help or support. I was going to make April 1st my trial quit date, but I think I’ll use today since I’ve been doing so well. I can remember the 31st as easily. Thanks again everyone!
  8. butterflyna
    butterflyna avatar
    125 posts
    Registered:
    15 Feb 2018
    31 Mar
    Link to this post
    WTG Hilz!!

    That's awesome to change your quit date to one day earlier than you originally planned . Show's your determination. That's fabulous! Keeping in touch with this forum and the Helpline Telephone has helped me tremendously. I don't think I would still be trying to quit if it wasn't for all these great people here ... and today I have 6 days smoke free. It is so amazing! I can't wait until you get here (when your ready). It just feels so dang clean, for me anyway. I almost died a few months ago cuz I have COPD and couldn't get my breath when I woke up. Scary as all get out I tell ya! I have been here basically since Jan of this year. Struggles and all I just keep coming back. These people (and the helpline) have been extramental in me even wanting to quit! So glad you are here! We need you <3

    butterflyna
8 posts, 0 answered