Quitting NRT

10 posts, 0 answered
  1. zachary
    zachary avatar
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    22 Nov 2018
    22 Nov
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    Hi: I quit smoking about seven or eight months ago now, and when I did smoke, it was only four or five smokes in the pack and then I'd throw it out. I'm on the spray from Nicorette, and I think it's affecting my blood pressure, which is quite high. I want to quit the NRT. I wonder about my chances for relapse, now that I can't smoke in my apartment (it's a new thing), but I'm still clinging onto the spray NRT. What is the best method to completely quit the NRT, which I love now more than smoking, without going into cranky withdrawal? I feel that I've gotten over the hump of being able to go into the convenience store wanting to buy smokes, but I want to stay quit and not relapse. I've been told that some poeple need to be on NRT for years just to make sure they stay quit, but, again, I worry about my blood pressure and wonder if cold turkey is the best method or not. If you have help or suggestions, let me know. This is unusual in that I've quit smoking, but I want to make sure I don't go back there. Zachary.
  2. efreeman75
    efreeman75 avatar
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    02 Apr 2018
    22 Nov in reply to zachary
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    Hi Zach

    It's a tough conundrum.  I can only offer my personal thoughts and experience.  I quit cold turkey.  While having a major nic-fit one night, my dear and understanding wife suggested that I should maybe try the Nicorette spray.  Off we go to purchase.  Instant relief.  Within a couple of days I craved the spray more than cigarettes ever.  Re-considered things, chatted with coaches here, and threw away the spray.  Couple days of hell, but kept myself distracted.  Didn't want to trade one addiction for another - I figured ultimately to be truly quit, you must be nicotine free. 

    Zach, you can wean yourself so far, but eventually you have to quit to be quit.  The fact that you're thinking such, likely confirms that it is time to suffer a little 'cranky withdrawal' to gain the ultimate freedom of beating this terrible addiction.

    Some people need the NRT for varying durations to ensure their quit.  If you're ready to take the plunge, we're all here to help and support you.

    E
  3. emily, quit coach
    emily, quit coach avatar
    108 posts
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    28 Nov 2017
    23 Nov
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    Hi Zachary,

    First, congratulations on your quit! Seven or eight months smoke free is a huge accomplishment.

    For some people using NRT for an extended period of time is helpful to aid them in their quits. However, it is recommended to speak with your doctor if you have been using it for longer than 6 months. This may be especially helpful as you are concerned about your blood pressure.

    If you are feeling ready to come off of the spray it may be useful to track how many sprays you are taking a day. Knowing this can help you to get started on reducing the amount you use. If you slowly reduce you may experience less nicotine withdrawal. Or as efreeman75 mentioned there is the option of stopping all together.

    If you would like any support working out a plan or if you have any questions please feel free to call into Smokers' Helpline at 1-877-513-5333.

    Emily
    Last modified on 23 Nov 2018 14:11 by emily, quit coach
  4. zachary
    zachary avatar
    4 posts
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    22 Nov 2018
    28 Nov in reply to emily, quit coach
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    Thanks Emily. I agree with the above poster -- the spray was better than smoking for me. So I decided to quit it cold turkey on Saturday. I've had some insomnia and constipation since then, and this morning is being particularly rough for cravings, but I've gone four days now without the NRT, so I assume the physical addiction component is over with? Anyhow, thanks for your replies guys.
  5. linda, quit coach
    linda, quit coach avatar
    92 posts
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    28 Nov 2017
    28 Nov
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    Hi Zachary,

    Congratulations on your quit! You are now seven or eight months smoke-free, it’s awesome! It’s a huge success! We are so happy for you.

    You have stopped using the spray four days now and you were wondering if the physical addiction component is over. We know that symptoms are usually strongest for the first few days and then dissipate over time. It seems like the worst is behind you. You have done a wonderful job! Keep moving forward in this way.

    The important thing to remember is that from the moment you stop smoking or using an NRT, your body will begin adjusting to the change and you might experience some symptoms as the nicotine is leaving your body. As your body works hard, be patient with it and remember that it is a temporary situation. Most symptoms will go away with time and they can lessen in just a few days or weeks. In the end, you will enjoy the benefits and freedom of being completely smoke-free and nicotine free.

    Zachary, you are doing something remarkable! You are smoke-free for several months and now, you are nicotine free, it is something to be really proud of – Way to go!

    We are thrilled for you and thank you for sharing your journey with us.

    Wishing you continued success!
  6. zachary
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    22 Nov 2018
    02 Dec in reply to linda, quit coach
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    Thanks for the encouragement and motivation. Eight days now. It's getting easier, I've noticed, though I still think about smoking when having coffee in the morning. However, I'm able to chase those thoughts away with "But I can't smoke in the apartment anymore, so what's the use in that." Anyhow, I hope I'm on the right track. I bought me some vinyl records with the money I save from the NRT and hope to increase my financial contributions to the church I go to with the money I would have spent on NRT which feels really great.
  7. efreeman75
    efreeman75 avatar
    83 posts
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    02 Apr 2018
    03 Dec
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    Hi Zachary

    I thought of you this weekend while I was cleaning my garage determined to fit a second car in there before the real snow comes.  I found a nicorette spray on a shelf that I had placed there 'just in case'.  It felt liberating to throw it in the garbage.  The only real regret was that it was that they are quite costly. 

    Speaking of money, I love your thought of increasing your church donations with the money you are no longer spending on NRT.

    Zachary - months without cigarettes and now more than a week without NRT, by golly, I do believe you've got this!
  8. merline, quit coach
    merline, quit coach avatar
    28 posts
    Registered:
    12 Sep 2018
    03 Dec in reply to zachary
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    Hi Zachary,

    First of all congratulations !
    Eight days now and I’m glad to hear that it's getting easier.

    Remember to reward yourself for your progress. Rewarding is one of the most important things you can do to help yourself stay on track.

    If you have any questions or concerns about quitting, you can call Smokers’ Helpline at 1-877-513-5333 (toll-free).

    Keep us posted.
    Zachary you are on the right track !
    Merline

  9. zachary
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    4 posts
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    22 Nov 2018
    5 days and 8 hours ago
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    I am now 16 days without the NRT. The past few days have become really easy, don't miss nicotine a lick, and am really starting to truly feel like a non-smoker. Here's to hoping that I never go back to that crushing addiction! Hope to stay quit
  10. efreeman75
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    83 posts
    Registered:
    02 Apr 2018
    5 days and 2 hours ago
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    Hi Zachary,

    So happy to hear that things are going well.  Isn't it enlightening to be a non-smoker? 

    The road ahead is so much brighter than what lies behind.
10 posts, 0 answered