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Best Advice

22 posts, 0 answered
  1. jenna lee, quit coach
    jenna lee, quit coach avatar
    265 posts
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    28 Jun 2018
    13 Feb 2020
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    Hello current and former quitters,

    We thought it may be helpful to have a post where everyone contributed with a tidbit on what helped them quit.

    If you were to give 1 piece of advice to anyone quitting, what is your best advice?
  2. breath20
    breath20 avatar
    5 posts
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    21 Jan 2020
    25 Feb 2020 in reply to jenna lee, quit coach
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    Good idea for a post Jenna Lee. 
    Here is my tidbit. 
    Day 54 smoke free cold turkey .Yay! What has helped me stay strong is an outdoor cigarette disposal cup on my back deck. You know, the plastic cup thingy with the hole in the centre you put your butts in. Anyway I emptied it in the fall and it must have had 80 butts jammed in there mixed with rain water that had also baked in the sun for a few months. I took the lid off and the God awful stench almost make me puke! The contents came out in black, slimey gunks and the smell got worse towards the bottom. It really was one of the worst things I've ever smelled. Anyway, whenever I've had a craving since I quit, I think about that smell, think about that black gunk in my lungs and arteries and visualize taking a sip out of that cup. Craving disappears instantly! That's what has worked for me and will continue to work for me. Just wanted to share.
    Last modified on 25 Feb 2020 21:13 by breath20
  3. efram, quit coach
    efram, quit coach avatar
    236 posts
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    29 Nov 2017
    26 Feb 2020 in reply to breath20
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    That black, slimy gunk sounds awfully disgusting, doesn't it? And probably smelled even worse. 

    Congratulations on 54 days of NOT having that gunk in your lungs and arteries!

    Thanks for sharing, breath20!

  4. eli000
    eli000 avatar
    2 posts
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    29 Oct 2020
    28 Oct 2020 in reply to jenna lee, quit coach
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    Hello,
    21 mg patches works miracles for me. Cigaret was my « best friend » since I was 13 years old (am now 28). In all the difficult times, I had my smoke to cheer me up. When I was bored, stressed, tired, happy, or anything, was a reason for me to smoke. In the morning first thing I thought of was coffee and smoke. Wakes up like a charm. But now, I wake up and I’m eager to put a patch on. I know it wakes me up just as much as a cigaret, but I feel 10 times better. I don’t even feel like smoking while on it. Good luck smokers, quitting is not impossible.
  5. spaghetti (formerly valleyman
    spaghetti (formerly valleyman avatar
    6 posts
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    08 Dec 2021
    10 Dec 2021
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    Hi I haven’t posted in awhile, my sister quit 13 days ago now and I told her she should join here. This is my best advice,there’s a ton support and help here.  Also if there’s another piece I could offer is change your routine ie: if you’re used to getting up and having that first coffee and cigarette, go for a walk instead, also reward yourself all the time. I’m sure you get the idea. 
    cheers and good luck 
    spaghetti (formerly valleyman) 

    my quit date was June 21 2008. 
    Last modified on 10 Dec 2021 08:10 by spaghetti (formerly valleyman
  6. jenna lee, quit coach
    jenna lee, quit coach avatar
    265 posts
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    28 Jun 2018
    11 Dec 2021 in reply to spaghetti (formerly valleyman
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    hello spaghetti,

    Thanks for taking the time to contribute to this forum and share your wisdom. Your sister is very fortunate to have you for support and we appreciate the referral!

    Changing one's routine can really adjust those automatic smoking motions we do and can definitely make smoking more mindful if we have to find a way to fit it in elsewhere.

    Again, thanks for sharing, and congrats on being smoke-free for 13.5 years!

    Jenna Lee
  7. dublinguy
    dublinguy avatar
    377 posts
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    09 Dec 2021
    13 Dec 2021
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    Im only new in my quit (day 7 today) but I think good advice is to acknowledge and know the habits and be aware of them. My day used to start with an espresso and two cigarettes out the back. I avoided even having the espresso for the first couple of days but now i just have it in the kitchen. Then it was like my body was programmed to have a smoke on the hour every hour.... and id take a 10 minute break at work on the hour to go smoke.. sometimes 2 smokes. That now has been changed... no smoke and make a coffee in the work kitchen. 
    Ive found that I cant drink much alcohol anymore either... the two used go hand and hand. 

    Not sure if that is really advice but I agree with this forum being a great resource. Its lovely to read the stories and experiences of others.
  8. healthcare8055
    healthcare8055        avatar
    1 posts
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    26 Mar 2022
    26 Mar 2022
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    wanted to ask that will yoga help in quitting ciggaretes. 
  9. sarah, quit coach
    sarah, quit coach avatar
    227 posts
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    28 Nov 2017
    27 Mar 2022 in reply to healthcare8055
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    Hello healthcare8055 
    Welcome to the forum and thank you for the question.

    You want to know if yoga can help you quit cigarettes. Many people have used yoga as a technique to help them quit - as a distraction, as exercise, and to manage their breathing. All of these things can have a benefit in managing cravings and/or withdrawal symptoms.

    Have you been thinking about incorporating yoga into your quit plan? What do you most need from yoga to help you make change with your smoking?

    Thanks
    Sarah
  10. Val H
    Val H avatar
    164 posts
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    29 Nov 2017
    18 Oct 2022
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    When I quit I used this forum a lot and gradual weaning of net’s. I also made the decision that, no matter what, smoking was not an option. Whatever I faced I would just have to find a new and more productive way to deal with it. This didn’t come from any extraordinary strength in me. I had numerable attempts to quit and just became willing to face my weakness. I quit in March 2020 and, in spite of my recent momentary struggles, feel grateful that I succeeded. 
  11. mike o
    mike o avatar
    20 posts
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    10 Jun 2022
    02 Nov 2022 in reply to sarah, quit coach
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    Pilates is great  too
  12. jimydrmz
    jimydrmz avatar
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    11 Nov 2022
    11 Jan 2023
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    I have been smoke free for two weeks now and I will never go back. I don’t care what it takes, I will never become a slave to those disgusting things again! I don’t mean to be disrespectful but, smoking is stupid! I keep telling myself this whenever I get a craving. Smoking is stupid , embarrassing and shameful! and I think I’m better than that!!! I will just put it down so hard that I could never pick it up again! 
  13. karen, quit coach
    karen, quit coach avatar
    46 posts
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    09 Nov 2022
    16 Jan 2023 in reply to jimydrmz
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    Congratulations on being smokefree for two weeks now, jimydrmz! Self-talk is a great strategy for getting through cravings. Sounds like you have some really strong reasons for staying quit. 
  14. gracchus
    gracchus avatar
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    04 Jan 2023
    03 Feb 2023 in reply to jenna lee, quit coach
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    Hi , Im 25 days cig-free. I think the best advice I give myself is that the moment a craving comes along I tell myself "This is temporary, this not going to last" . And it never does. But reminding myself of this makes it bearable while I ride it out.
  15. chartippybum
    chartippybum avatar
    83 posts
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    21 Mar 2018
    26 Feb
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    One thing I remember doing when I was first quitting and having g cravings is that I would put on a good long song and just get lost in the music. The song was I would do anything for love by meatloaf so it was a longer song and I would ride out the craving by listening to that.

  16. givemestrength
    givemestrength avatar
    4 posts
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    18 Mar 2024
    13 May
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    This thread sure shows me that everyone is unique and maybe their reasons for smoking and methods to quit have to be as unique. I don't handle change well so, I left everything as it was. Ashtrays are still there, I think there is a pack of smokes somewhere. I want my smoking friends to stay my friends LOL. I do exactly the same things I ever did, I just don't light up. I say to myself "you don't do that anymore". I'm only on day 13, but I already got a better blood pressure reading, so I think I will definitley stick with the not smoking. BTW, I smoked for 45 years.
  17. emily, quit coach
    emily, quit coach avatar
    254 posts
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    28 Nov 2017
    14 May
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    Hello give me strength, 

    Congratulations on 2 weeks smoke free!

    I couldn't agree with you more, everyone is unique and so their methods for quitting are as well. It's great to hear about your quit plan and what has been working for you. Glad that you're already noticing some benefits of going smoke free with your blood pressure reading. That can be really motivating. 

    Look forward to reading more about your journey.
    Emily
  18. dublinguy
    dublinguy avatar
    377 posts
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    09 Dec 2021
    21 May in reply to givemestrength
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    That’s fantastic givemestrength! 45 years sure is a lot of smokes but look how well u are doing… day 13 that is now day 23! The days sure fly by and we get stronger as we keep going. Everyone’s way of quitting is unique but we all have the same goal. NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE. Just know u are not alone in this fight and keep posting. It really does help
  19. mrcookiedough
    mrcookiedough avatar
    4 posts
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    26 Mar 2024
    26 May in reply to jenna lee, quit coach
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    Go easy on yourself if you slip. A beating about the head will only make things worse. Just be cool. Start over. You are not a bad person. You are human.
  20. givemestrength
    givemestrength avatar
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    18 Mar 2024
    13 Jun in reply to emily, quit coach
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    Thanks Emily AND dublinguy. It's difficult to bounce things off of non-smokers because it tends to be uninteresting to them and they can't relate and I would imagine I just sound like I'm bragging to my smoking friends, so I like talking here. I became anxious when I quit, or more so, it's like there is stuff on my plate that I'm not getting to. I can finish everything on my to-do list and sit like a deer in headlights. No accomplishment feelings, like a not-done-yet feeling, incomplete. I worked on metitation for years to get grounded and feel present and smell the roses and it's like I lost it all. So at 6 weeks in now, I'm looking at how that could still be. It's the absence of the good trigger. There are good and bad triggers in life, or pavlovian reactions, and a cigarette told me I had finished, that I did a good job, that I could turn the world off now, that I earned the priveledge of feeling satisfied and grounded. Now there is no cigarrette. So I go try to accomplish something else. Still nothing, so I try doing something else. Eventually I pass out for the night, but my life feels so racey, like I'm always racing to something and never getting there. You know? Do I replace the reward at the end of a task or day? How many years would it take to create a new trigger?
  21. jb63
    jb63 avatar
    114 posts
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    28 Feb 2022
    14 Jun
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    Congrats Givemestrength
    Six weeks is a great accomplishment   Your post is very interesting how you say that you are missing your good triggers or rewards. I can relate to that in the beginning of my quit I too felt lost and was always looking for something. I feel I got used to not using cigarettes as rewards. When I completed a task. I would sit down somewhere nice and have a cup of coffee. I still do that today 
    You can also say the big accomplishment is that I’m a non smoker. 
    I also found posting my progress on this forum very helpful as you would always get great encouragement back
    Best of luck 
  22. mrcookiedough
    mrcookiedough avatar
    4 posts
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    26 Mar 2024
    4 days and 10 hours ago in reply to givemestrength
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    Hello givemestrength. If I might offer an idea that I've brought up elsewhere. When you've done all your things, and there's that reward gap where a cigarette used to be, give this a try.

    Lie down where you are most comfortable. This could be your bed but a couch will do, or even a nice soft carpet.

    Start breathing in through the nose and out through the mouth. Be strict about keeping to this pattern of breathing. I do mine for about five to ten minutes, sometimes longer.

    This way forces you to remember to breathe slower. But most important, it forces the heart to slow down. You will likely experience a calmer feeling then what you go through now.

    You are feeling some kind of expectancy where you're on the edge of your seat, but it's a feeling that can be settled down if you use the breathing trick I mentioned.

    The best to you. We're all rooting for you, wherever you're at in life.
22 posts, 0 answered