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Quitting again but with a new perspective

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  1. notmissingout
    notmissingout avatar
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    01 Jun 2022
    01 Jun
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    Hi all,
    Well I have become a non-smoker just over 3 weeks ago. I quit in the past but started up after 3 months. This time is different. I used Champix initially but then didn’t tolerate the side effects of Champix so I stopped the meds and now am just not smoking. No NRT either. Just purely motivated by wanting to be there for my kids (who have disabilities). Have had a lot of recent stressors since quitting on Mothers Day (have some physical health conditions newly diagnosed involving pain) and my mother in law just passed away. I don’t know how I didn’t start smoking again but I just told myself “that’s not me anymore”. My perspective is now “this is what I’m gaining by being a non-smoker” rather than my previous thinking which was “I quit smoking therefore I must miss it because I’ve lost something I used to do every day all day”. My mind set is now focusing on what I am gaining rather than what I’m missing out on. And this has made a big difference in managing any cravings. Lots of deep breaths and lots of water sipping through a straw (to give that tactile sensation on the lips and sucking motion one would typically do to take a drag on a smoke). It’s working so far. 
    good luck everyone. 
  2. dublinguy
    dublinguy avatar
    270 posts
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    09 Dec 2021
    02 Jun
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    Well done notmissingout on quitting again and sticking to it. You must be very strong to go without NRT. You've passed the 3 week point now which is a major hurdle for many of us. The cravings keep striking and trying to lure us back to our old ways. But quitting smoking brings so much good, you will feel a lot better because of it.
    We're all here to support you so post updates on your progress as we go. I love reading other peoples stories cause this journey can get lonely at time (and difficult), and it just helps knowing there are others going through or been through something similar.

    Keep going and well done again.
  3. notmissingout
    notmissingout avatar
    4 posts
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    01 Jun 2022
    02 Jun in reply to dublinguy
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    Hello dublinguy,
    Thank you for your kind words and encouragement. I agree there are cravings that come and go - sometimes strong cravings - but I try to distract myself, do some mindful breathing and go and do something else. I watched a video on Facebook by a woman who touted to help over 10,000 people quit smoking via hypnotherapy - and her main focus was on recognizing that our mindset is so critical to how we perceive the act of not smoking. If we perceive it as a “missing out” (even the language we use of “quitting” makes us psychologically believe that we are missing out or losing something by not smoking …. So I have adopted this viewpoint that I am a non-smoker. I am gaining the ability to breathe deeply without coughing or wheezing. I am adding time to my life (well maybe just not taking days or weeks off my life by smoking), and I am mindfully choosing to be around for my kids. It’s a bit of a mind bender really. But perspective is everything. 
    How long have you been smoke-free?
    cheers 
  4. dublinguy
    dublinguy avatar
    270 posts
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    09 Dec 2021
    02 Jun in reply to notmissingout
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    That's something I've heard before... the language we use is important. We have to see 'quitting smoking' as something that we are 'gaining' not 'losing'. It makes sense to think of it that way as we really are gaining freedom in so many aspects... health, mental well being, financial...
    I quit back in December on the 6th so I'm almost at the 6 month checkpoint. (6 months with 2 slips).

    The 3's are the worst. 3 days (feel like youre crawling the walls), 3 weeks (mental exhaustion hits) and then 3 months (the physical withdrawal is gone but you get mental craves). Its different for everyone but that's a general rule of thumb Ive seen again and again on here.

    3 weeks is great... your target now is to get to a month. You can do this.
    Last modified on 02 Jun 2022 12:18 by dublinguy
  5. treepeo1
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    06 Feb 2020
    04 Jun in reply to notmissingout
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    Hi notmissingout,

    Congrats on your 3 smoke free weeks.  Good for you!

    I love your attitude.  You are so right.  It is not what we are missing, it is what we are gaining.  I often tell people to get excited about their quit, because it is not every day that you can change your life in such a meaningful way.  I quit cold turkey, too, over 5 years ago.  I tried to focus on all the positive things that come with quitting, and that really helped me to stay strong.

    Your children do need you.  And also, you want to set a good example for them.  I know it's still hard right now, but stay the course.  As you know, minutes turn into hours, hours turn into days, and before you know it, weeks go by.  Your quit will become more and more valuable to you as times goes on.

    Keep doing things to distract yourself.  And give yourself little rewards along the way.  Positive reinforcement does help.  And remember, you are stronger than your addiction.  Believe in yourself.  You deserve to be a non-smoker!
  6. notmissingout
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    01 Jun 2022
    04 Jun in reply to dublinguy
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    Thanks dublinguy and congrats on your 6 months smoke-free. That’s awesome ! Tonight (in a couple hours) it will be 1 month for me. My partner smokes but since I quit, he smokes outside only and I choose whether I want to be around it or not. I will often say I can’t go outside with him and he is very supportive. I know my quitting has caused him to cut down a lot too which is awesome. He doesn’t smoke around me. One day hopefully he will be willing to quit too, when he is ready. 
  7. notmissingout
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    01 Jun 2022
    04 Jun in reply to treepeo1
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    Hi treepeo1 and thanks for your kind support! Tonight is one month smoke free. I notice that I crave sugar more now. And I’m not beating myself up for it.  My doc said not to worry too much about gaining a bit of weight - that it’s better than continuing to smoke. 
    im changing my routines. Feeling good about my progress. Don’t ever want to start smoking again. So tired of being controlled by it. 
    take care! 
  8. freedomchild
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    18 Jan 2022
    07 Jun
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    Congratulations  on your 1 month smoke free. Good for you. Your doing awesome. Your right,  A little weight gain is a lot better then smoking. I wouldn't worry about it so much. Pat yourself on the back and for such a great job. NOPE , Not One Puff Ever. 
  9. aurora
    aurora avatar
    92 posts
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    08 Mar 2018
    13 Jun
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    Hi notmissingout, 

    Congrats on your progress on your new way of being. I agree with you about perception and perspective. What our mind says to us, and what we say to ourselves, we can put up obstacles that can be hard to overcome. 
    I changed to a new way in early March 2018, so it has been over 4 years. Part of maintaining my new way was to focus on freedom - oh, how I detested feeling like I "needed" to smoke! I really enjoyed the freedom in so many ways, that focus helped me immensely.
    I did it for myself and for my young son too, who was begging me to quit. 
    You got this! 
    NOPE - not one putt ever.
  10. mike o
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    14 posts
    Registered:
    10 Jun 2022
    21 Jun
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    Good work not missing out- the rationale in quitting is important and for me fundamental in my own quit rationale this time- I realised the reasons I started smoking and continued smoking now no longer exist- and haven't thankfully for years! - So why continue smoking?

    this kind of physiological thinking is examined in the cbq method in the free resources on the website for any one interested.

    I also like you put some thought into addressing the physical management in quitting is now important too and how you address so you’ve aced it also. 👍 

  11. optimist
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    11 Jul 2019
    22 Jun in reply to notmissingout
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    Hi notmissingout:  Congratulations on your success so far.  I too notice an increase in desire for sugar.  Does anyone know why this would be?
11 posts, 0 answered